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How to Choose The Best Threaded Rod

  • Release date:20-03-2017
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    A threaded rod is a type of metal fastener with threads […]

    A threaded rod is a type of metal fastener with threads cut into both ends. These rods resemble the shank of a screw, yet tend to be longer and thicker than a standard screw. Threaded rods do not have heads or washers like those found on a screw on bolt, and tend to be the same diameter along their entire length. Depending on the model, a threaded rod may feature threads along the entire length, or simply at either end. This product is sometimes known as all-thread, and can also be referred to simply as a stud.

    The threaded rod is one of the most used fastener methods used today. This is because of its high durability, the amount of materials this type of rod can be found in, and the various sizes. Some can be found as small as fractions of an inch in diameter, while others quite a bit larger.

    Many industries make use of the threaded rod in one way or another. While most do it yourselfers know the shorter versions as used in normal household applications, those in the construction, plumbing, electrical, general repair, and automotive repair industries are well aware of how useful they are.

    When choosing threaded rod, buyers must consider a number of factors to select the right product for the job. One of the most important decisions is the type of material each rod is made from. Standard steel or aluminum rods represent the most popular options, with stainless steel varieties generally reserved for outdoor applications or corrosive environments. High-strength rods may be needed to support heavy loads, and brass or zinc studs may be used to enhance visual appeal on certain types of projects.

    Buyers must also consider the length and diameter of each threaded rod. These rods can generally be cut to size using a grinder or saw, but it's often easier to choose the correct length from the beginning. Users must also consider the type of threading on each rod. Courser threading may be required for heavy-duty projects, while finer threads may be needed in more delicate materials or small projects. The ends of each rod may be chamfered or coned to meet the needs of different applications.